In March of 2014 the Colorado Court of Appeals overturned a Jefferson County District Court decision made against one of Altitude Community Law’ clients.  In the ruling the Court of Appeals agreed with the arguments put forth by Brianna Schaefer, Damien Bielli and Loura Sanchez. Altitude Community Law felt that the District Court ruling wasGo to Resource
Both the Colorado and Federal fair housing laws prohibit discrimination against any person in their use of a dwelling based on their “familial status”.  Essentially, discrimination based on familial status is discrimination against people with children.  The fair housing laws and regulations prohibit rules that have the effect of restricting a resident’s use of theGo to Resource
In today’s world it is not uncommon for an association to be faced with discrimination allegations.  In some cases, the discrimination is obvious but more often than not discrimination occurs in a more subtle form – not by direct discrimination but by enforcing a rule, restriction, or practice that has the effect of discriminating againstGo to Resource
When dealing with the operation of common interest communities, some people begin to take on industry vocabulary and just expect everyone else to understand what they are saying and how important the statement being made may be.  Statements such as, “Well, CCIOA (pronounced Kiowa) says, you must disclose board emails” and “the maintenance obligations forGo to Resource