Borrowing Money

As the association industry matures, more and more communities are faced with the responsibility and need to perform major repairs of common facilities.  Often, because of poor planning, inflation, or unanticipated problems, associations have not accumulated sufficient reserves to finance needed repairs. In the past, when faced with major repairs and insufficient funds, associations hadGo to Resource
Although homeowner associations are created as nonprofit corporations, this does not mean the associations do not engage in financial transactions or require the services of a certified public accountant (CPA). For example, it is common for an association’s governing documents to require a financial audit or review on an annual basis, and associations are requiredGo to Resource

Association Taxation and Reserves

The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) excludes from an association’s taxable income those amounts which are properly kept and used for capital contributions.  In several significant Revenue Rulings, the IRS considered special assessments for major repairs and replacements to be capital contributions in addition to capital contributions to reserve funds from annual assessments. For assessments toGo to Resource